View profile

You are what you tell your customers

Jason Wong
Jason Wong
I finally took a much needed break and went on a month long trip in Asia. As a result, I haven’t been posting or writing the weekly memos, but happy to say I’m back!
The topic this week is on cementing a brand narrative in your customer’s head. In other words, how do we make sure that our customers know what we do, and how they communicate to other people our value props.
For the past 3 years at my brand doe lashes, we’ve been pushing the tag line “cloud like comfort” and “softest and most comfortable lashes for your eyes”. From time to time we would use variations of the two tag lines, but the same messages apply.
Mass plant the descriptions that you want your product/brand to be known by
I’m talking about your hero banner copy, PDP description, packaging box description, ad copy and press mentions. The goal is to create this image that everyone is in unison about something about your product. There’s a  psychological phenomenon called Groupthink in which people strive for consensus within a group. The more people you get to echo about something on your brand, the more people after them will conform to the same ideas. Of course, this only works if your product actually meets what you’re promising, but for the sake of this memo, let’s say that you actually do.
When you make these promises, it becomes the focal point of what people look for when they’re evaluating the product. If our lashes actually won’t natural looking or comfortable, people would focus on criticizing those exact points.
Story-telling to support the brand narratives
To really push a message, you need to consistently create micro content to amplify the narrative. These are contents on your social like Instagram and Tiktok, blog posts and site copy. When you can tie visuals and a good story behind the promises that you make, it becomes more memorable for the end customer, which in turn makes it easier for them to spread the message. We made a number of Tiktok videos to help people visualize our production process to support how truly unique our lashes are, which makes them soft and light to create the lightweight experience.
When you look through our reviews and comments, you’re going to notice our customers echoing back the same words.
“So lightweight and just perfect! One of my favorite lashes for sure.”
“…The lashes are super comfortable so I can wear them 8+ hours without any complaints!”
“So lightweight and natural! The clear bands are a game changer for an effortless look!”
These are just some of the reviews that we’ve gotten this week. If you go back on 3 years of review and make a word cloud, you’re going to see the same thing. Words like ‘light weight’, ‘natural’, ‘soft’, and ‘comfortable’ being used over and over again.
This was all by design.
Think about the last product recommendation that you gave to your friend and look back at how much of what you’re saying is influenced by the copy and brand narrative that the brand planted across their touch points. When we really like something and we’re looking for words to describe it, we get inspirations from the source. It’s just easier on the brain instead of trying to reinvent new words.
Your job now is to figure out a group of descriptive words that relates to your product and the experience that it creates. Find that out and plant it in as many touch points as you have with your customers.
Creating the army that echos you
Mass plant the descriptions that you want your product/brand to be known by
I’m talking about your hero banner copy, PDP description, packaging box description, ad copy and press mentions. The goal is to create this image that everyone is in unison about something about your product. There’s a  psychological phenomenon called Groupthink in which people strive for consensus within a group. The more people you get to echo about something on your brand, the more people after them will conform to the same ideas. Of course, this only works if your product actually meets what you’re promising, but for the sake of this memo, let’s say that you actually do.
When you make these promises, it becomes the focal point of what people look for when they’re evaluating the product. If our lashes actually won’t natural looking or comfortable, people would focus on criticizing those exact points.
Story-telling to support the brand narratives
To really push a message, you need to consistently create micro content to amplify the narrative. These are contents on your social like Instagram and Tiktok, blog posts and site copy. When you can tie visuals and a good story behind the promises that you make, it becomes more memorable for the end customer, which in turn makes it easier for them to spread the message. We made a number of Tiktok videos to help people visualize our production process to support how truly unique our lashes are, which makes them soft and light to create the lightweight experience.
🎙 This Week's Building Blocks Episode
Ep. 31 How Gefen Skolnick’s Independent, Learning First Business Model Rocketed Couplet Coffee to Success in One Year - Ecommerce Building Blocks
Help a friend
A big inspiration for starting this memo and writing my learnings is because I wish I had the same resources when I started my brands 8 years ago. I set a goal for myself to help at least one person with the newsletter and now there are thousands who read the memo each week. If you want to make a difference in a new founder’s life (without starting a memo yourself), please share this with them so they can get this in their inbox every week. Here’s the link to join.
Thanks so much for reading and hope you all had an awesome week!
Did you enjoy this issue? Yes No
Jason Wong
Jason Wong @eggroli

Quick 5 minute reads every Friday in your inbox to wrap up what's going on this week in the DTC space, growth strategies, and my memo as a founder building a beauty brand.

In order to unsubscribe, click here.
If you were forwarded this newsletter and you like it, you can subscribe here.
Created with Revue by Twitter.